What does success look like? (from the New York Times)

In other words, the price of familial obligation As a prolific reader of any publication that contain the words “New York” I subscribe to a lot of newsletters from—you guessed it—the New York Times. One of them is called The Edit, a newsletter specifically for the “young” ones, written by recent college graduates about things that pertain to their world today. I may not be … Continue reading What does success look like? (from the New York Times)

Raising kind kids, one step at a time

I’m not usually the superstitious type. Sure, I believe in the Chinese zodiac and its predictions on personality, relationships and success in life, but things like phases of the moon or Friday the 13th or 666 being unlucky numbers are simply beyond me. But somehow, for the past few weeks, I’ve stumbled on several articles in various locations around the internet, including a podcast, that … Continue reading Raising kind kids, one step at a time

How to talk to your child about death

I may be making a big assumption here, but I would say that most people’s first memory involves something pleasant—being held by someone who loves them, riding a fun ride at an amusement park, meeting a new sibling, getting a puppy, receiving toys for Christmas, riding a bike, etc. My first memory involves nothing of the sort. In fact, it involves death. Death laid next … Continue reading How to talk to your child about death

What works for one might not work for another

Lately, I’ve decided on one thing–that there is too much literature on how to be a parent. You’d think that with the age group most primed to be having kids right now (millennials) are having less kids and having them later in life that there would be less articles, blog posts and books on parenting, but I see them all the time! Perhaps it’s because … Continue reading What works for one might not work for another

What I learned from four years in banking

Last week, I ran into someone I knew from an old job on the train. It was 7 o’clock in the morning. He was heading to work and so was I. This wouldn’t have been any more common occurrence than riding the train itself, but every once in awhile I run into Paul. He and I exchanged a few brief sentences. He still teaches fitness … Continue reading What I learned from four years in banking