Book Review: Farsighted by Steven Johnson

If there’s anything that I’ve learned from the past year or two of writing consistently and putting it out there for everyone to see, I learned that human beings can be quite snotty. All it takes is a single bad review or comment to really ruin a person’s day. It’s something I’ve had to accept–that everyone is entitled to their own opinion, as do I, … Continue reading Book Review: Farsighted by Steven Johnson

What does success look like? (from the New York Times)

In other words, the price of familial obligation As a prolific reader of any publication that contain the words “New York” I subscribe to a lot of newsletters from—you guessed it—the New York Times. One of them is called The Edit, a newsletter specifically for the “young” ones, written by recent college graduates about things that pertain to their world today. I may not be … Continue reading What does success look like? (from the New York Times)

Book Review: The Help by Kathryn Stockett

Have you ever read a book that is so powerful and so enlightening because it opened up your eyes to a world that you’ve never been in and have no understanding of? This feeling doesn’t happen to me very often, but when it does…especially if it comes from a book, I am amazed because only a small number of books have done that for me. … Continue reading Book Review: The Help by Kathryn Stockett

A comparison of two Stephen King novels

Imagine the the first story–a middle class family moves to a small town in New England called Ludlow, Maine because the husband got a pretty good job. The house they move into is perfect–spacious and quiet, with nice neighbors around, and even a field where the kids can play. The only problem is–the house is situated next to a busy freeway, where trucks and cars … Continue reading A comparison of two Stephen King novels

Book Review: Anne Frank–the Diary of a Young Girl

On the many ways in which I felt connected to Anne If there’s ever a book that is more depressing and yet lively, filled with the fluidity of human emotion, it would be The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank. I first read this book many, many years ago in high school—when you’re learning about the Holocaust and World War II, it was the book … Continue reading Book Review: Anne Frank–the Diary of a Young Girl

Book Review: Us by David Nicholls

If I had a list called “Books I Didn’t Think Were Good but Is Actually Really Good,” the book Us by David Nicholls would top the list (along with Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine and Crazy Rich Asians). It’s the kind of story that I would write if I were to write a book (although my version wouldn’t be nearly as good as David’s). The … Continue reading Book Review: Us by David Nicholls